Tutorial: How to Equalize Textures in Photoshop

header

Isn’t it a beautiful concept to make textures using DSLR cameras? It is, until you won’t place them on a big surfaces and hit tiling problems like uneven brightness, visible seams, color shifts etc. There are few tricks to deal with these problems though. One of them was recently showed here. It inspired me to write this post and show you how I prepare my textures before I make them tileable.

Personally I rarely use Photoshop to paint out tiling. Programs like Pixplant or Imagesynth let you make tileable textures automatically using seed images. Although it’s not a perfect solution for wood and other organics, it can save a lot of time. Basically, you can take few photos of a surface, import it and get a tileable output with just a few clicks. Theoretically it works with all “raw” photos but practically it’s better to invest more time and prepare them carefully before importing. Making them even in terms of color tone and overall brightness will pay off in the end.

I’d like to show you the way I equalize my seed images using layers in Photoshop. But firstly I have to admit that it’s based on this mini tutorial by Peter Guthrie. To be honest I just couldn’t grasp it fully so I started to mess around with layer blends and eventually developed my own technique. The goal was to minimize the amount of steps.

Step by Step

Bookmark Cgtextures.com if you haven’t done it yet 😀
Open it in Photoshop
Duplicate Background layer [ Ctrl-J ]
Open Filter > Blur > Average…
Double click Background layer to change it into movable layer.
Move it to the top of the stack, change it’s opacity to 50% [ 5 ] and blending mode to Linear Light
Open Filter > Other > High Pass… and play with Radius parameter to control the effect
Usually Radius 100 works just fine but depending on the photo you might want to tweak it in the range of 50 – 150.
  1. Download Image 1 (Large) from this page
  2. Open it in Photoshop
  3. Duplicate Background layer [ Ctrl-J ]
  4. Open Filter > Blur > Average…
  5. Double click Background layer to change it into movable layer.
  6. Move it to the top of the stack, change it’s opacity to 50% [ 5 ] and blending mode to Linear Light
  7. Open Filter > Other > High Pass… and play with Radius parameter to control the effect

Note: If you’re using the latest Photoshop version you may need to click “Show All Menu Items” in order to access Average and High Pass…

Radius of 100 works just fine in most situations but you might want to tweak it in the range of 50 – 150 depending on image resolution and size of detail.

Actions

I use this trick a lot, 90% of my textures are equalized and as you imagine, it’s not very handy to go through all these steps each time I edit a seed image. Turns out you can easily automate the process using Actions, so now it’s a single clicker!

Examples

example_01
wood

 

 

 

example_02
copper

 

 

example_03
cardboard

Cheers 🙂

Advertisements

48 thoughts on “Tutorial: How to Equalize Textures in Photoshop”

  1. What the hell XD
    I was just at a site i usally visits and there was a link to this… and like i have been here many times before and have it bookmarked and everything. The internett is small after all 🙂
    Thanks for the tutorial by the way.

  2. Hi guys! I’ve more simple method 🙂

    In Adobe Photoshop

    1. Change color mode to LAB color
    2. Select Lightness channel
    3. Apply HighPass filter to this channel and play with radius
    4. Change color mode to RGB

    That`s all 🙂

    1. Hi, thanks for sharing your method 🙂

      I did some testing and found it works much different than the one I described. It seems to leave color information intact. This may produce some color ghosting on highly saturated textures, but I guess this may be a nice alternative for all these cases in which my method fails. Definitelly worth creating another action.

  3. Well, aside from the fact that this isn’t really “Image Equalization”, it’s still one good tutorial. There’s nothing like tileable textures.

    Nothing, Nope! Thanks!

  4. Thanks so much for sharing Tolas! This method far surpasses any others in it’s straight-forwardness and simplicity! 🙂

  5. Wow, I can’t believe how much time you just saved me. This little tutorial, might just be the best thing I’ve found in months. Thanks man! Thanks a ton.

    1. Check out blog post now. Link is fixed. You will find 2 action files inside. One of them is the original one done by me and the second one was posted by someone here in comments section. The second one is much better!! Enjoy!

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s